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Managing your Global Workforce

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It’s hard enough to manage a local workforce, but if you have offices and freelancers in different parts of the world, then you’re really in for a challenge. Payza has offices in the United Kingdom, the United States, Canada, India, Bangladesh, Russia and Poland, so we know all about managing a global workforce.

In becoming a global payment platform, Payza has acquired a lot of first-hand knowledge about how best to face these challenges. Payza’s experience in setting up overseas operations is discussed in detail in this feature published by Business without Borders, an online news source reporting on international business development.

Before you begin to navigate the many challenges facing a multinational business – language differences, cultural differences, time differences, regulatory requirements and more – we’d like to offer a few words of advice that should help you to prepare.

Language Differences: If you don’t speak the language of your workforce in another country, you have to consider how to most effectively communicate with them to ensure that they can get their jobs done according to your guidelines and standards. The management team in the other country might have to be multilingual so that they can communicate with you effectively and communicate to their team on your behalf.

Cultural Differences: Different cultures have different practices and attitudes towards work and professionalism. You can’t expect them all to work the same way that your team in your home country works. Prepare yourself for these types of cultural differences to better manage your workforce. You might have to have a different set of rules for each of your offices that more accurately reflect the cultural practices and beliefs in each country.

Time Differences: This one can be a bit of a pain, especially if your team on the other side of the world is 12 hours ahead. Planning conference calls and setting deadlines must be done carefully. You may have to be flexible regarding the hours you work to support and communicate with your staff in other countries in order to avoid any problems the time differences may cause.

Regulatory Requirements: Get ready to learn about the various regulatory requirements of each country in which you have an office to avoid fines and other problems. Labor rights and responsibilities differ from country to country, so you will have to know them all to ensure that your employees are treated with respect and in conformity to the regulatory requirements of their country.

Workforce Management: If you use workforce management software that logs hours, attendance and absenteeism, work requirements and deadlines, make sure that it can be used on different computer systems and in various languages and locations. Managers should be well-trained on the use of the software so that they can manage their teams effectively.

Global Payment Solutions: You might also have to consider how to pay your employees across borders. With the simple and secure Payza platform, you can pay all of your employees regularly and in one shot with our Corporate Disbursements feature. Just upload a CSV file with names, email addresses and the amounts owed, and we’ll disburse the funds accordingly.

If you employ a global workforce, be prepared for some challenging work and a lot of research. Know their languages, cultural practices, labor rights and responsibilities, and the issues that can arise with time differences and putting in place a workforce management system. If you are new to this, it can take a while to get all of your teams on the same page, but be patient.

If you operate a multinational business with a global workforce and have some comments and tips of your own for merchants just like you, please leave a comment below or join the conversation on our Facebook and Twitter pages.